The Importance of a Warrant

The law exists to equalize and protect. However, it is also necessary for us to have some protections against the government and law enforcement officials, as outlined in the Bill of Rights. One of the most important articles in this document is the Fourth Amendment, which protects you from unreasonable search and seizure, meaning that the police must have warrant to search your property in almost all cases.

When you are charged with a crime, you are still innocent until proven guilty. During legal proceedings, you cannot be subjected to search and seizure without a warrant. To help you protect your rights as the accused, you should contact a tenacious Dallas criminal defense lawyer from the Law Offices of Mark T. Lassiter today at (214) 845-7007.

The Fourth Amendment Protections

If police suspect you of a crime, their actions towards you can ruin your reputation and cause extreme emotional distress even if you are innocent. Thus, the Bill of Rights and the Fourth Amendment are meant to balance out the power of the law with the protection of the people. Some rights outlined in the Fourth Amendment include:

  • Search warrants must be executed by a member of the judicial branch and supported by probable cause
  • Arrest warrants must come from the judicial branch and must also supported by evidence
  • Search warrants can be limited, which law enforcement officials must follow

Although there are times when law enforcement officials can search and seize without a warrant, it is always important to ask to see this document before consenting to a property search or arrest.

Contact Us

A warrant may seem like a piece of paper with unintelligible legal jargon. However, this document is one of your main protections against aggressive action from the police and other law enforcement officials. For a lawyer who wants to protect you against unreasonable search and seizure as well as other illegal actions, contact a Dallas criminal defense attorney from the Law Offices of Mark T. Lassiter at (214) 845-7007 today.


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